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for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
, as you point out, and what we are seeing is that the areas that have high lead in the environment also have low school scores, they are areas where the police are spending some time looking at in terms of high crime rates. that connection is clearly made when you start mapping. >> so there's at least three different layers of this research showing this connection. one is like the mapping of the relationships in the time they are occurring. the other is the time lag data about lead gasoline emissions and the kids who were exposed to it grow up, there's a crime wave. lead gasoline emissions go down. kids under the lower ones, there's lower crime. there's individual data about iq and blood levels. kevin, this report was terrifying to me. >> yeah. in addition to the statistical evidence, kids who grew up in the '50s, early' 40s and '50s. it affects their brain development. we have known for a long time lead affects iq and school scores. in the last ten years, there's a new line of evidence suggesting it affects areas of prefrontal cortex in the brain. those are areas that affect emotional
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
hikes, what the environment will be like in washington, especially with a lot of republicans they seem to be running scad. >> that is where just as mayor giuliani said, the republicans should not run scared, they should tell the truth, and get the facts out to the people. >> jim: but they are not doing it. >> they are not doing it. maybe the mainstream media is ignoring them, this is a simple message, if you want to government to grow at the rate it is growing, and you are okay with this big government you see, you have to pay for it, a lot more than we are now, and a lot more than hiking taxes on the rich, now, but they can't get through the noise. >> well i don't see much of a attempt to try to get the facts out to the people, i think that have to figure out a way to connect with the people and be able to tell them the truth. you know margaret thatcher said that the problem with socialism or kd of government that obama is trying tony flick o to inflat sooner or later you run out of other people's money. neil: we might be seeing that now, a lot of americans seeing payroll taxut makeo
in the state of the union to work together. we have tried to create an environment where we would be able to work on things that have historically been challenging, but i think we need to do both. >> i think i am out of time. >> we will get the clock fixed. >> thank you for your service, mr. chairman. i want to draw attention to the last time you came before this committee. it was an unusual time were you did not just talk about a balanced budget, but as you referenced, you working with president clinton and this conference -- and this congress produced a balanced budget, something that no other president before or since has done in decades. our republican colleagues, when they took over instead of building on that success, they squandered that success. they never met a tax break that they did not like and they believed in the alchemy that those tax breaks would not for pay for themselves. that in addition to the tax breaks that they advanced, they advanced one increase in spending after another, increasing spending at an incredible rate without wanting to pay for it. after eight years of
for the women to be heard. it's an old boy's network and some describe it as a hostile work environment toward women, that the president does some business and bonding at his basketball games which are all male and there's a way that you could sort of set yourself up to be arm's length from the top women in the white house, to when you get to the big decision making moment, oh, i just don't know any top qualified women. >> well, i think one of the challenges he has, you have to look at him, the father of two minority women, and in the case of even my own family, my father, while he makes great, you know, tries to try to include more women he's naturally in most cases gravitates toward men, the same way i gravitate towards other women talking about challenges in my life. and that's one of the challenges that corporations and law firms are looking at heavily, how do we address this in a way that men and women are comfortable relying on each other. book to pipeline, hillary clinton did raise a daughter and did so with a lot of help around and a lot of women going into the senior roles are having
the time. >> let's talk about this. the president wants a legacy of environment, gun laws, energy, is he going to get this or trapped in this debate over budgets and taxes and spending cuts? >> the budget, tax and spending, not so much on the tax but when history looks at what happened in the deal on the fiscal cliff, a lot of positives there. the 99% of the people get permanent tax cuts. that is a big deal if you're president of the united states. or even in congress. 1% 0 going to pay more. i would say certainly that's the right policy. so maybe it's not so bad. the problem is that the process was like this permanent divorce court. and you just could not unravel in any meaningful way what's going on, what's going to happen and so you have the brigade of biden and mitch commonly coming in -- mitch mcconnell coming in at the last minute. >> zpwhr and is it in everyone's interests to get something done, the republicans need a legacy to reshape their image or just committed to try to block the president, gloria, at all costs? >> i think they're going to be blocking. and look, the tax issue
the case be made for all women in a college environment? you have been the president of such a school. >> one of the things people think is a single sex school is all women. we have some male professors. the tilt is female, but we have male professors. they are not sitting in a convent. you have other school that are close by. so, none of these children or young people are being koiserred. it's an important point to make. a lot of them think they are going to be. however, i think there are lots of benefits. there are some disadvantages. there are 4,000 plus colleges in the united states. 4,000. you have clernlg colleges for african-american. 45 women's colleges. you have one founded for jewish people, why not variety? i didn't go to a single sex school. a lot of women who are achievers didn't. some want to make that choice. they want to learn and be focused. they want to have the opportunity to learn without the distraction of young men in the room and they are being prepared to go into a world with all the tools that make them unintimidated by men. they have learned how to argument.
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concern. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already have given their approval to this relationship and value it as one that is good for afghanistan. in that context, the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve, and i am sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about during our conversations, and perhaps many times in that conversation, beginning with the composition of, of course.-- the conversation, of course. i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that those gains will be kept by any standard while we're working for peace and stability in
world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the generals there like general stanley mcchrystal than he has with others. and i talked with pentagon officials yesterday who were saying they weren't sure how these meetings were going to go because you just never know when you're dealing with president karzai what you're going to get. and in fact i even e-mailed a couple days ago the folks i met in afghanistan during previous trips and they were somewhat concerned, as well, saying they weren't exactly sure what karzai was going to say while he was here with president obama because a lot of people in afghanistan especially some of the leaders there still very much want u.s. troops because they're fully aware that the afghan forces are not going to be ready by the end of next year. >> absol
't need because of the change in the geopolitical environment the stealthy helicopter or the high end artillery. based on what you're seeing in the geopolitical situation, what does that mean future investment. what should be we investing in what should we continue to buy more of? less of. are there vampire programs with using your phraseologies that should be cut? what is the geopolitical environment mean for investment? >> well, again, my friends in the army are mad at me. unfortunately, i think there is here a shift what was the phrase bob used longer, large, basically large prolonged -- [inaudible conversations] >> yeah. that's a good prediction today. who in august of 2001 reconduct -- predicted we would have one in afghanistan? i think it's a dangerous thing in the business. it seems to me to that we needs to strengthen our maritime capability in the western pacific and not to contain china or fight a war with china, god for bid. i think the goal has got to be to try to sustain the peaceful situation, which is only thirty years old. it's the -- we have a huge interest, i think,
today it will still be a dangerous environment. we will still need to do force protection, but the mission will change this is how we start to leave and it will happen as of this spring which is a surprise. faster than anybody said it would happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey. holey with an "e," not ah. this is because of the progress that's been made in terms of after began security forces, capacity to take the lead. i don't really know anything about the strength of afghan security forces and neither do you, unless you are just back from the war, which case, welcome home. but the pentagon's report to congress on that subject which reportedly was ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official u.s. pentagon report on the readiness of afghan security forces, far from afghan security forces ready to take the lead, out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades capable of operating independently without support from international or u
be a dangerous environment, that we will still need to do force protection. but the mission is going to change. this is how we start to leave. and it's going to happen as of this spring, which is a surprise, which is faster than anybody said it was going to happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey, not holy as in ahh. president obama saying the acceleration was possible in part because of what has been made in terms of afghan security forces, their capacity to take the lead. i don't know anything about afghan security forces, and neither do you unless you're newly back from the war, and welcome home, but the pentagon's report on that suggest which was reportedly ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official pentagon support on the readiness of afghan security forces says far from afghan security forces being ready to take the lead, it says out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades is capable of operating independently without support from internationa
tinkering with the environment, what kind of political steps would have to be taken before that would be allowed? >> exactly. and it's funny because when you deliberately say we are going to tinker with the environment it triggers all of this response but sometimes like he said, something like, okay, the internal company combustion engine -- >> interesting. >>> meanwhile the secretary of state hillary clinton, she is out of the hospital. >> and she is ready to step down. next our political insider on what she needs to do to stay politically relevant. we will be right back. e ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> president obama is expected to nominate former republican senator chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. >> that announcement could happen as soon as tomorrow. now, hagel would be replacing current secretary of defense leon panetta. hagel represented the state of nebraska from 1997 until his retirement in 2009. meanwhile, the president has already nominated senator john kerry as the next secretary of state. so with those transitions in mind, we turn to former mayor willie brown and sa
it to other people. be careful about your environment. bring purell with you restaurants. if you start to get the symptoms, stay home. >> that's a big part of it, isn't it? >> we were doing this report how it's $10 billion will be lost in people who call in sick because they have the flu, but what if people are coming into work who don't feel very well and suddenly just how easy is it to give it to somebody else? >> that's one of biggest problems, it's so contagious right now and the strains that are out there are so contagious and severe, that if you have symptoms and you go to work, there's a very good likelihood you'll give it to other people. and it doesn't feel good when you give it to friends and family. if you are sick, don't go to work and don't go to school. stay home, drink a lot of soup and tea and catch up on dvr. >> because of the severity of the situation, i was shocked to hear this, the archdiocese of boston and they feel they have a health emergency is telling priests they can suspend distribution of communion and alter sign of peace. and the shocking fact, the average desk is
in afghanistan? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leadership [indiscernible] in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic as we lo
on some gun measures. what's clear here is the political environment in washington, we've seen over the last several months, how it's been very difficult to get movement on anything that goes down to the wire for lawmakers to come up with some sort of bipartisan agreement. what the vice president is spelling out here, is floating, essentially he's talking about the reality of the current political climate here in washington. yes, there are things that can be done legislatively. but if those things can't be done, then the president is willing to act alone. why? because he says it's time to act no now. >> i want to make it clear that we are not going to get caught up in the notion, unless we can do everything we'll do nothing. it's critically important that we act. >> in addition to these meetings that you spelled out earlier that the vice president is holding today, yesterday he also met with some faith leaders. they talked about the moral imperative to act quickly. he also had a conference call with governors, other stated and local officials across the country. they're really tryin
and political realities of the united states, it's probably not a surprise. regulatory environments, economic income, wealth distribution, absence of growth, all of this is just not great news for economic freedom. >> is used to be the place for capital growth. we are increasingly dropping this and it is a common thing. should we be worried? is that the world saying that we have other more promising spots? >> it is a worry. you have to be concerned. can you reverse this? what are the causes? i think we have to focus the attention on can we compete and can we make the sacrifices. >> are you optimistic we can do this? >> it's just not a pretty deal. it's income distributed. we need to have some leadership to forge the path forward. i don't know how many ceos and cfos say i just need to find out how this works in a welcome i guess the uncertainty leads to something. but what now? neil: there is the president himself saying that we don't understand at. >> you are right. what we are worried about, and what everyone should be worried about is down the line and the rate of growth of entitlements. we
up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. haour first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have to be thinking, how much more reve
campaigning for the environment. he says becoming a grandparent just makes that more important. he also says he worries every night because his sons don't just honor the military, they serve in it. in a rare interview, prince charles says he feels he will have to answer to his royal grandchild on the state of the environment. >> you are soon to be a grandfather for the first time, so many congratulations. >> i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild, why didn't you do something? it makes it even more obvious to try to make sure that we leave them something that isn't a total -- >> reporter: environmental causes, something he shared with his children, growing organic vegetables on his farm and recently had an endangered frog named after him. >> we present you with a frog. >> reporter: but prince charles heir to the throne is also a military parent. immediate worry is prince harry serving as an apache helicopter pilot in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away
in this current fiscal environment to ensure the success of the space launch? >> thank you, sir. that is a tall order. i think one of the crucial things the consolation program was supposed to do is to provide a smooth transition for the work force and for the capability the nation has off of the shuttle program to what ever came next. and we've lost that now. the deep integration between the low earth orbit and the destinations that was hoped for i think is also gone. i would first say 2012 is not 2008. we are in a different and new situation today and we have to look at going forward. the primary, one of the primary problems with the end of the constellation was again cutting ourselves off from our international partners who didn't see how they were going to participate increasing risks to the international space station because while we certainly hope for and encourage and want to see the private sector to go for that work if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complemen
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
a clunker for the environment. they say the program produced tons of unnecessary waste while doing little to curb greenhouse gas emissions. the emphasis was on car shredding and not recycling even though they say cars are almost completely recyclable. if they had recycled just metal and plastic it would have saved 24 million barrels of oil. department of transportation deemed cash for clung ears success. >> welfare recipients are taking out cash at new york strip clubs liquor stores and x-rated shops and presumably spending it there. they looked at 200 million or ebt records. the food stamp programs bans purchase of booze and lottery tickets with ebt card but cash assistance and is intended to spent on housing and utilities and household necessities can be obtained at atms. a senior fellow says, quote. i don't blame riptsd, if you are poor, its crummy life and you wanted to have a drink or see a naked woman. i blame the people who are in charge of this. >> a massachusetts democratic governor is downplaying the news his state cannot locate 19,000 people who have either been receiving welfa
they become violent and help create the positive environments in schools. >> legal la mcdowell, the advancement project. great to have you on this morning. >>> coming up, the power of prayer. the atlanta pastor that was picked by president obama to deliver a benediction at the obama inauguration. coming under fire for a sermon that he gave in the '90s which may have given him a disinvite. >> did you look at his signature? >> not that i'm aware of. >> that is jack lew, the president's nominee for treasury secretary. what we know about him besides that weird looking signature? >>> and does president obama need a binderful of women or is that overblown? tweet me @thomasroberts. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so co
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
. >> do you think there is a way we can do corporate reform in this environment? >> is extremely difficult but i think one really positive thing that came out of this fiscal debates this time is that for the first time in a long time, the business community unified around a concept of getting our deficit under control. they were not as worried about their individual tax breaks that might go as a result of having some reform. i hope that mood continues. that was a one group does not argue over one other or about accelerated depreciation and so forth. i am more hopeful that a more unified view from the business community is possible this time. >> i want to say one thing -- i'm not fully knowledgeable about this. i was at a meeting earlier today we're in noted tax expert said you cannot do corporate reform and not to individual reform because when we change the parameters, a whole lot of entities shifted from c corporations to other forms that were taxed on the individual side. if you lower rates on the corporate tax and get away with some of the preferences for oil and gas and various things
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leaderships and international community. in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
to live in that stressful environment. >> bill: you needed to get out of there to clean up? >> that's what ended up happening. i have had the longest period of sobriety since leaving. >> bill: how did you get off? >> i went to rehab. but i went to many rehabs. how did i stay off is more the question. >> bill: okay, go. >> well, i got married. had a family. had children. i have relationships that are more meaningful in my life today like my cousin chris, than the superficial relationships that i spent most of my time nurturing when i was in political life. >> bill: did you go like he did into a structure into a crew this is what you have to do? >> to the best evidence based crossing anyive behavior which is 12 step program. deal with it every single day. >> bill: the book, recover to live, if anybody out there has a problem or knows people who do. check this out. gentlemen, would appreciate you coming. in did you a noble thing. >> appreciate it. >> bill: bernie goldberg on the ethics of printing the names of legal gun owners in the newspaper. berne is is next. aig? we said we were going to
this election for you in a tough environment. hold your noses, vote for me even if you're not 100%, and i can win the white house. that's how bill clinton won in 1992. he took on a ton of liberal constituencies, but because the democratic brand was damaged in '92, he was able to distance himself from it to help democrats. >> much like the republican brand now. >> exactly. >> look, let me -- erin? >> yes, roland. >> last i checked, criticizing congress is not going to somehow hurt you with the american people. so governor christie is frankly walking on -- like jesus walking on water criticizing republicans and democrats in congress. but here's the other piece you have to keep in mind. we're four years away. this whole notion of what's going to happen, so many things could very well happen. but if chris christie is able to reach out to grassroots folks, he's all about trying to appeal to republicans in congress, republican governors. it's about appealing to grassroots people. if he's able to show that kind of enthusiasm, that kind of energy, that's actually going to drag other people along. >>
our national security needs are, and make cuts in the environment and housing and transportation, and i just believe that i'm better prepared having just done what i have done to do this. it's not that i'd be the best interim senator ever. just that in these particular circumstances with very complex issues as kind of a continuation, i'm there, and i believe it's very important for us to go after them, for example, on this phony, irresponsible issue on the debt limit and do defense, social security, and medicare. the two most successful anti-poverty programs in history. at a time when people say we have too much inequality, the notion you would increase in equality is nuts, and further -- look, i had some unhappiness when i read about chuck hagel's remarks from 14 years ago, which i didn't remember, but now the question is he's a man who is going to help us withdraw from afghanistan and reduce the military. i'm very encouraged by that. my one criticism of the president was he wasn't going far enough in reducing the military. i think people now understand that it's either keeping
with a lot of self-confidence and comfortable in his own skin. in this town, any political environment, you have to get to know the other side and empathize with them. it's not one of his greatest ranks so far. >> you point that out today in your piece, learning how to smooz could be a difference between a good and great presidency for president obama. who f how do you think he's doing so far? >> it's a struggle for him. we saw with the negotiations with republicans specifically speaker boehner, granted the republicans aren't giving an inch and they are very hard-headed and aren't willing to accommodate. but past presidents have had just as tough if not tougher rivals to go up against. instead of running towards boehner and running towards his enemies up on the hill getting to know him. the small favors in politics, visits to the white house, sitting down for drinks, invitations on air force one, those are all small things and to the general public seem petty but they mean a lot in relationships. and the president was very good in springfield illinois, if you talked to people that worked wi
for them. he is not responsible for them having a proper environment in which to do their jobs and that will include making sure that don't ask, don't tell and elimination of don't ask, don't tell is fully implemented. >> with regard to the military budget, he has called the military a bloated organization. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey, said this week that we are on the brink of creating a hollow force. would a secretary of defense hagel preside over the hollowing out of the defense department? >> the biggest concern with respect to who will league out is this sequester that's hanging like a sword over the department. that's what they had tried -- have to not let that happen but with respect to going in and finding things within the department of defense that perhaps you don't need or you can eliminate, if that's what you mean by bloat, i hope he does find bloat and gets rid of it. >> do you agree with his characterization that it's bloated? >> bloated doesn't necessarily mean the whole department is bloated. bloated mean there is are probably things in the depa
. not in great measure but continued to burn gas, producing greenhouse gas right in to the environment. the second is that in pennsylvania, because really wells have never been regulated in pennsylvania. you can build a water well there with a paper clip if you want to. there are methane leaks through almost every well in pennsylvania because they have layers and layers of rock really producing biogenic methane. it's a thing that needs to be contained. >> all right. tom, thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> up next, you think people get fired up over this? you have no idea the twitter fury on our own steve kornacki, a very nice young man for not referring to the president as the president. i'm with sandra who just got these great glasses. you paid...wow. hmmm. let's see if walmart can help you find the same look for less. okay. see? walmart has all these leading eyewear brands and styles. rockstar! really? yeah. oh, wow! oh, black frame looks good on you. yeah? you can get a complete pair starting at just -- $38. really?! and did you know that our glasses come with a free 12-month re
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